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CSJ poll supports the strengthening of family as an essential agenda

The Centre for Social Justice conducted a recent polling exercise in an effort to shed some light on the public’s perception of family and its impact on community. The data dispels the myth that the strengthening of family is an unfashionable agenda, and is helpful evidence for those of us who wish to promote the important role of families in the formation of a well-functioning, flourishing society. See below for some of the headline statistics:

  • Almost three in four (72 per cent) British adults think that ‘family breakdown is a serious problem in Britain today more should be done to prevent families breaking up’.
  • An even greater proportion would back extra public money being spent on strengthening families and improving parenting to prevent social problems (76 per cent).
  • Almost 7 in 10 people (69 per cent) think it is ‘important’ for children to grow up living with both parents and more than eight out of ten adults (81 per cent) think that ‘stronger families and improved parenting are important in addressing Britain’s social problems’.
  • 88 per cent of parents agree with the statement ‘it is important for children to grow up with both parents’, including almost two thirds (62 per cent) of lone parents.
  • More than 9 out of 10 (91 per cent) of lone parents support public money being spent on strengthening families and improving parenting with children in poverty.
  • The public also strongly back the institution of marriage with seven in ten British adults (71 per cent) agreeing that: ‘marriage is important and government should support married couples’. 75 per cent of British adults support a specific tax allowance for married couples. Almost eight out of ten parents support a tax allowance for married couples including 57 per cent of lone parents.

For more information on the ‘CSJ attitudes to family polling, Summer 2017′ visit www.centreforsocialjustice.org.uk.

Photo by Mike Scheid on Unsplash

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